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EDUCATION LEAD GENERATION FOR FOREIGN CLIENTS

   

An estimated 900,000 foreign students are expected to enroll in American higher education institutions this year with the big North American nation experiencing an astonishing 40+% increase in international student enrollments over the past decade. 


Indeed, 10 years ago, fewer than 600,000 foreigners were undertaking courses in US universities and colleges. Despite this huge jump in numbers, overseas students still comprise less than 4% of America’s 21 million higher education students. 

And although the number of internationally mobile students around the world has more than doubled since 2000, the US share has actually fallen by 10%.


On the other hand, America’s university and college students seem far more reluctant to go abroad to study than the foreigners competing to enroll in US institutions. In the last academic year, fewer than 285,000 Americans left home to study for credit courses – less than a third the number of foreigners arriving. Of those departing America’s shores, the top five destination countries were Britain, Italy, Spain, France and China in that order, with Germany, Australia, Cost Rica, Ireland and Japan making up the top 10. At the same time, though, the number studying abroad did rise by 3%, with increasing numbers heading to Latin America and China.

With more than 170,300 students studying abroad, India is the world’s second-largest supplier of international students (after China). However, the percentage of Indians studying abroad is still small, and amounted to no more than 1% of the total Indian student population in 2014. The most popular foreign destinations of Indian students in 2014 were the US, Australia, the UK, Germany and New Zealand.

Factors influencing outgoing student mobility

Half of the Indian population is younger than 25. This, in combination with a growing knowledge-based economy, is likely to lead to an unprecedented increase in the demand for higher education. Given that the domestic availability of higher education does not match this demand, increasing numbers of Indian students have already opted to study abroad. This trend is likely to continue in the coming years. For Indian students, the following factors appear to be the most important in encouraging them to study abroad:

• Although there are several top-class institutions in India, in general there is a shortage of high-quality higher education programmes and cutting-edge research and research facilities. Access to the top-quality programmes can also be an issue.

• As a result, the reputation of Indian higher education and research in general is poor.

• India has cultural, economic, educational, linguistic, historical, political and religious ties to other regions and countries, which may encourage students to study in these destinations.

• India has an increasing population wanting to move on to tertiary education, and domestic economic growth allows many of them to do so abroad.

• Due to the country’s large young population and its current shortage of higher education capacity, India is considered an attractive country to attract students from. Because of this, there is extensive information available on potential hosting regions, countries and institutions.

The main factor discouraging Indian students to study abroad is the growing availability of higher education in India itself. This is reflected in the efforts of the Indian government to focus on building domestic higher education capacity and its interest in retaining Indian students in India. Moreover, one of the rationales of the government’s efforts to retain Indian students is to have part of the money (approximately US$ 4 billion) that Indian students are currently spending on their studies abroad, invested in higher education in India itself.

Another blocking factor,made apparent by the recent incidents with Indian students in Australia, is that Indian students and their parents are sensitive to safety issues within the foreign country, city and institutions. 

So, email us today at data@studentsleads.com to get Indian Students for Abroad Education.  


Indeed, 10 years ago, fewer than 600,000 foreigners were undertaking courses in US universities and colleges. Despite this huge jump in numbers, overseas students still comprise less than 4% of America’s 21 million higher education students. 

And although the number of internationally mobile students around the world has more than doubled since 2000, the US share has actually fallen by 10%.

As is happening across other countries in the West, students from China far outnumber those from any of the 24 other nations whose students make up the vast majority enrolled in America. 

As University World News reported last November, the 235,600 Chinese students studying in America comprise nearly 29% of all foreigners enrolled in US higher education and their numbers have jumped by more than 21% over the past 12 months. The ever-rising numbers are a measure of both the increasing size of China’s middle class and the desire by ambitious young Chinese to gain an American credential.

Apart from the Chinese, students from Saudi Arabia are now the fourth most numerous on American campuses following a 30.5% jump in their enrolments to 44,600 in 2013. But the 97,000 students from India and the 70,600 from South Korea were down by 3.5% and 2.3% respectively on the previous year.

Surprisingly, given the tense relations between the US government and Iran, the number of Iranians studying in the US rose by 25% to 8,700 in 2013, compared with a 26% increase for students from the Middle East in general. Iran now has more of its citizens studying in the US than any other Middle Eastern country except Saudi Arabia, while Iraq had a 33% increase for its students to 1,070 and Oman an 82% rise to 980.

On the other hand, America’s university and college students seem far more reluctant to go abroad to study than the foreigners competing to enrol in US institutions. In the last academic year, fewer than 285,000 Americans left home to study for credit courses – less than a third the number of foreigners arriving. 

Of those departing America’s shores, the top five destination countries were Britain, Italy, Spain, France and China in that order, with Germany, Australia, Cost Rica, Ireland and Japan making up the top 10. At the same time, though, the number studying abroad did rise by 3%, with increasing numbers heading to Latin America and China.

Indeed, 10 years ago, fewer than 600,000 foreigners were undertaking courses in US universities and colleges. Despite this huge jump in numbers, overseas students still comprise less than 4% of America’s 21 million higher education students. 

And although the number of internationally mobile students around the world has more than doubled since 2000, the US share has actually fallen by 10%.

As is happening across other countries in the West, students from China far outnumber those from any of the 24 other nations whose students make up the vast majority enrolled in America. 

As University World News reported last November, the 235,600 Chinese students studying in America comprise nearly 29% of all foreigners enrolled in US higher education and their numbers have jumped by more than 21% over the past 12 months. The ever-rising numbers are a measure of both the increasing size of China’s middle class and the desire by ambitious young Chinese to gain an American credential.

Apart from the Chinese, students from Saudi Arabia are now the fourth most numerous on American campuses following a 30.5% jump in their enrolments to 44,600 in 2013. But the 97,000 students from India and the 70,600 from South Korea were down by 3.5% and 2.3% respectively on the previous year.

Surprisingly, given the tense relations between the US government and Iran, the number of Iranians studying in the US rose by 25% to 8,700 in 2013, compared with a 26% increase for students from the Middle East in general. Iran now has more of its citizens studying in the US than any other Middle Eastern country except Saudi Arabia, while Iraq had a 33% increase for its students to 1,070 and Oman an 82% rise to 980.

On the other hand, America’s university and college students seem far more reluctant to go abroad to study than the foreigners competing to enrol in US institutions. In the last academic year, fewer than 285,000 Americans left home to study for credit courses – less than a third the number of foreigners arriving. 

Of those departing America’s shores, the top five destination countries were Britain, Italy, Spain, France and China in that order, with Germany, Australia, Cost Rica, Ireland and Japan making up the top 10. At the same time, though, the number studying abroad did rise by 3%, with increasing numbers heading to Latin America and China.

TOP 10 ABROAD EDUCATION SEEKERS INDIAN STATES OR CITies

1. Hyderabad

2. Mumbai

3. Chennai

4. Bangalore

5. Delhi/NCR (Gurgaon, Noida, Ghaziabad and Faridabad)

6. Ahmedabad

7. Pune

8. Kolkata

9. Punjab

10. Chandigarh & Indore. 

TOP 10 ABROAD DESTINATION STUDY FOR INDIAN STUDENTS 

1. THE UNITED KINGDOM

2. THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

3. AUSTRALIA & NEW-ZEALAND

4. CANADA

5. RUSSIA

6. SINGAPORE

7. THE NETHERLANDS

8. GERMANY

9. ITALY

10. IRELAND 

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